Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun

Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun 1

According to Cho Chikun, in his Igo Master Class (達人囲碁指南) series, vol. 4, Master of Shinogi, he says that shinogi does not just mean making life under pressure, it means parrying an attack. For example, when the opponent makes a play that carries a dual threat, finding a defense for both threats is shinogi.

Really good explanation by Cho Chikun! I got asked by a reader, to make an article about shinogi. It seemed really an easy task at glance, but finding an example was tough. I checked many games and even the example that I brought below is probably not the best and if soon I find a better one, I will try to make another article !

Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun 2

Takemiya Masaki 9p taking black against Cho Chikun 9p, game played on Jun 16 1981. Black attached with 1 to attack indirectly the center group, white pulls back at 2 and black manages to extend in order to split white’s center group from any possible connection to the bottom side. White’s marked group in the center is now under attack and has to survive.

Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun 3

White plays kosumi at 1 looking forward to push at A or to make a good shape by playing 4, so therefore black wedges with 2 and white connects at 5 to protect against the cut. Black’s connection at 4 makes the connection between B and C more secure. Black assures his connection with his last move which threatens to play D and damage white’s stones at the top.

Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun 4

White extends at 2 to protect the top. Then black attacks powerfully with 3 and white tries to finish his shinogi by attaching at 4, to either kill black’s marked stones by playing at A or to break through and make eyes. Therefore, to defend after 6, black plays the last marked move.

Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun 5

White gets a chance to cut and black extends. If black tries to capture white’s stone, then white will possibly split black’s top group.

Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun 6

White captures one stone, black defends the right side by playing 2 and then to protect the territory marked with A he plays the last move, which also threatens to kill white.

Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun 7

White threatens to push with 1, so black defends his right side, white is pretty much alive at this point.

Shinogi Explained: Takemiya Masaki versus Cho Chikun 8

White captures with A, black forces at B and now you can see clearly that white has two eyes at 1-2. White successfully settled his group by parrying black’s attack, focusing on black’s weak points. We can say that white succeed and that this is an example of shinogi. Cho Chikun is really good at this and the reader can find many examples of shinogi in his games.

If I find a better example, I will make another article for sure. This example shows that, although black was so much stronger in the center, white managed to use black’s weaknesses and at some point it was not sure who is attacking who, well played by Cho Chikun!

Follow me in social media:

Sharing is caring!

Leave a Reply

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *